Record 4,000 audience attend open-air premiere of Utopia in Australia

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John Pilger's epic new film, Utopia, had its premiere in the urban heart of Indigenous Australia, in the Middle of Sydney, on 17 January 2014. The crowd filled the equivalent of two football pitches. Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians came from all over the country to hear the call for a renewed struggle for justice and freedom for Australia's first people.

Utopia, already released and broadcast in the UK, is named by the London Film Review as 
one of the five best films of the year.

On
30 January 2014, Utopia began its Australian cinema release at Cinema Nova in Melbourne.

For details of other screenings of Utopia in Australia and New Zealand, visit the official Utopia website

For all distribution enquiries in Australia, contact Gil Scrine of Antidote Films on [email protected] For community events, contact Paddy Gibson at [email protected] For all other enquiries, please use the contact form on this website.

Reviews
: CineVue | The Guardian | The Observer | Total Film | Metro | The Times (subscription only) | All reviews

Click here for more information about the film.

Once again, Australia is stealing its Indigenous children

In an investigation for the Guardian, John Pilger expands the evidence in his new film, 'Utopia', to reveal the scandal of a second Stolen Generation.

It's the other Oscars - and yet again the winner slips away

In his latest column for the New Statesman, John Pilger steals a march on the Oscars with the 'celebrity Oscars' - 'those whose ubiquitous self promotion demands recognition'.

Is media just another word for control?

John Pilger describes censorship in 'free societies' on a special edition of BBC Radio 4's Today programme guest-edited by artist and musician PJ Harvey.

How to support the Aboriginal people in their struggle for justice

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The public response to the broadcast of Utopia on the ITV Network has been widespread across the UK. Many people have asked what they can do to support Aboriginal people in their struggle for justice.

I recommend that people write to Prime Minister Tony Abbott, calling on him to start, without delay, negotiations for a fully constituted Treaty between the Commonwealth of Australia and all the First Nations of Australia. This would included long overdue restitution and universal land rights.

The Hon. Tony Abbott, MP
Prime Minister
Parliament House
CANBERRA ACT 2600
Australia

I suggest you copy your message to the Australian press.

John Pilger

Australia's boom is anything but for its Aboriginal people

In an article for the Guardian, John Pilger reveals that the story of the first Australians is still one of poverty and humiliation, while their land yields the world's biggest resources boom.

The new propaganda is liberal. The new slavery is digital.

John Pilger examines propaganda as not so much a conservative concept as a quintessentially liberal concept, an extremism that never speaks its name.

The pursuit of Julian Assange is an assault on freedom and a mockery of journalism

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John Pilger describes the augmented Anglo-American government and media campaign against Julian Assange and WikiLeaks as Assange is granted political asylum by Ecuador and remains in that country's London embassy.

How the chosen ones ended Australia's sporting prowess and revealed its secret past

John Pilger describes how sports-obsessed Australia's disappointing showing at the London Olympics offered a glimpse of a secret past.

You are all suspects now. What are you going to do about it?

John Pilger describes the politicising of the law in western democracies and the emergence of increasingly draconian police powers: the corollary of a contrived state of 'permanent war'. Why should this be accepted?

John Pilger's latest film 'The War You Don't See' available to watch online

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John Pilger's latest film 'The War You Don't See' is now available to watch online (worldwide excluding Australia) for $4.99

'The War You Don't See' premiered at the Barbican in London on Tuesday 7 December 2010 and on British television on Tuesday 14 December 2010. It is also available to buy on DVD in the UK and in Australia 

On 7 June 2011, the Lannan Foundation in the United States banned the film and cancelled a visit by John Pilger without explanation. Read John Pilger's response to Patrick Lannan's subsequent statement about the cancellation.

On 17 November 2011, John Pilger presented 'The War You Don't See' at its Indian premiere in Delhi. Read an interview with John Pilger in The Indian Express.

Reviews: The Guardian | Total Film | Time Out | Little White Lies | The Quietus | Cine Vue | ABC News

Watch the trailer | John Pilger - Why are wars not being reported honestly?Watch Democracy Now! interview with John Pilger about the film | Read New Internationalist interview with John Pilger about the film | Listen to a BBC Radio 4 interview with John Pilger about the film | ABC Breakfast interview | ABC Late Night Live interview | ABC Book Show interview

More about the film.

Protect Assange, don’t abuse him

John Pilger argues that years of 'identity politics' have had a marked effect on those who might otherwise see clearly the principles raised by WikiLeaks and the need to defend Julian Assange.

Welcome to the new John Pilger website

Welcome to the new John Pilger website, a remarkable resource and historical record and now arguably the most comprehensive online collection of the work of a leading journalist. For the first time, the majority of John Pilger's 58 films for television and cinema can be viewed online. New features include a video and article search, a newsletter, social media tools and an RSS feed. The site's relaunch has been made possible by the University of Lincoln, which is preparing a complete digital archive of John Pilger's work.

The party game is over. Stand and fight

John Pilger describes the disenchantment with parliamentary politics as the British "coalition" government pursues its devotion to 'an extreme political cult of money worship'. He suggests there is only one course of action now.

Chile's ghosts are not being rescued

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As the 33 Chilean miners are brought to the surface after ther epic rescue, John Pilger describes the unspoken life in Chile behind the media facade that the government of President Sebastion Pinera has skilfully exploited.

The BBC is on Murdoch's side

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John Pilger says that while the dangers of Rupert Murdoch's dominance are understood, the role played by the respectable media, such as the New York Times and the BBC, notably in the promotion of colonial wars, is at least as important.

C'mon, time to rebrand your life!

John Pilger examines the effect of 'extreme corporatism' - money - on sport. He contrasts the last of the great sporting stars who were not celebrities in the modern sense with the enrichment of Rupert Murdoch and the corruption of sports like cricket.

Flying the flag, faking the news

John Pilger traces the history of propaganda to Edward Bernays, the American nephew of Sigmund Freud, who invented the term "public relations". Bernays believed in "engineering public consent" and creating "false realties" as news. Here are examples of how this works today.

Why Wikileaks must be protected

John Pilger describes the importance of Wikileaks as a new and fearless form of investigative journalism that threatens both the war-makers and their apologists, notably journalists who are state stenographers.

Tony Blair must be prosecuted

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John Pilger writes about the "paramount war crime" defined by the Nuremberg judges in 1946 and its relevance to the case of Tony Blair, whose shared responsibility for the Iraq invasion resulted in the deaths of more than a million people. New developments in international and domestic political attitudes towards war crimes mean that Blair is now 'Britain's Kissinger'.

The charge of the media brigade

John Pilger describes how an all-pervasive corporate media culture in the United States prepares the way for a permanent state of war. And yet for all the column inches and broadcast hours filled, the brainwashing is not succeeding. And this, he suggests, is 'America's greatest virtue'.

The black art of news management

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John Pilger describes the "master illusions" which have formed the basis of black propaganda and provided "false flags" for political chicanery and for wars and atrocities, such as Iraq and the Israeli assault on the Gaza peace flotilla.

The heresy of the Greeks offers hope

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John Pilger inverts the perception of Greece as a "junk country" and sees hope in the uprising of ordinary Greeks protesting against the "bailout" of an economy plunged into debt by the tax-evading rich. Greece, he writes, is a microcosm for the developed world, where class war are the words seldom used because they are the truth.

Voting in Britain for war. Take your pick

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John Pilger describes how Edwardian notions of war are again being promoted in western democracies, along with the militarising of history, journalism and parliamentary politics. In Britain, the three main candidiates for prime minister are declared warmakers; and yet popular feeling is very different.

Why sharks should not own sport

John Pilger describes how the rich and powerful have taken over and distorted the people's pleasure - sport, from Tiger Woods Inc to the World Cup, soon to begin in South Africa. Pilger looks at the way Fifa and multiple sponsors have invaded South Africa and ordinary South Africans have been pushed aside in the cause of profiteering.

Have a nice world war, folks

John Pilger describes the increasing American war front across the world: from Afghanistan to Africa and Latin America. This is the Third World War in all but name, waged by the only aggressive "ism" that denies it is an ideology and threatened not by introverted tribesmen in faraway places but by the anti-war instincts of its own citizens.